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Our training sessions

February 2023
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Our programs

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Aero-Formatech® is a company that relies on experienced instructors known for the quality of their professional cabin safety training skills. Since its foundation in 1992, Aero-Formatech® has been offering custom crew member training programs to Canadian and international pilots, flight attendants, instructors, technicians, ground personnel, managers and inspectors. The company uses training materials and products that are environmentally friendly.

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The Canadian aviation regulations require that all crew members of airline companies be assigned duties to perform in any emergency situation or evacuation. Training participants will be shown that the performance of techniques learned adequately addresses any emergency situation that may be reasonably anticipated.

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References
Swissair Flight 111

Swissair Flight 111 (SR-111, SWR-111) was a Swissair McDonnell Douglas MD-11 on a scheduled airline flight from John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, United States to Cointrin International Airport in Geneva, Switzerland. This flight was also a codeshare flight with Delta Air Lines.

On Wednesday, 2 September 1998 the aircraft used for the flight, registered HB-IWF, crashed into the Atlantic Ocean southwest of Halifax International Airport at the entrance to St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia. The crash site was 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) from shore, roughly equidistant from the tiny fishing and tourist communities of Peggys Cove and Bayswater. All 229 people on board died.[1] It was the highest-ever death toll of any aviation accident involving a McDonnell Douglas MD-11.

The initial search and rescue response, crash recovery operation, and resulting investigation by the government of Canada took over four years and cost CAD 57 million (at that time approximately USD 38 million).[2] The Transportation Safety Board of Canada's (TSB) official report of their investigation stated that flammable material used in the aircraft's structure allowed a fire to spread beyond the control of the crew, resulting in the loss of control and crash of the aircraft.[3]

Swissair Flight 111 was known as the "U.N. shuttle" due to its popularity with United Nations officials; the flight often carried business executives, scientists, and researchers.[4]

Source : Wikipedia

Air Crash Investigations - Fire on Board (Swiss Air 111)

A Massive fire rages inside the swiss air plane. It is now up to the investegators to work out why such a good air Liner came topeling down to earth.

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